Quick Answer: Can Osteomyelitis Lead To Sepsis?

What is the most common cause of osteomyelitis?

Most cases of osteomyelitis are caused by staphylococcus bacteria, types of germs commonly found on the skin or in the nose of even healthy individuals.

Germs can enter a bone in a variety of ways, including: The bloodstream..

What are the long term effects of osteomyelitis?

Osteomyelitis needs long-term care to prevent complications such as: Fractures of the affected bone. Stunted growth in children, if the infection has involved the growth plate. Tissue death (gangrene) in the affected area.

Does osteomyelitis require surgery?

Surgery. Depending on the severity of the infection, osteomyelitis surgery may include one or more of the following procedures: Drain the infected area. Opening up the area around your infected bone allows your surgeon to drain any pus or fluid that has accumulated in response to the infection.

What is the best antibiotic for osteomyelitis?

However, if all infected bone is removed, as in forefoot osteomyelitis, antibiotic therapy can be shortened to 10 days. Oral antibiotics that have been proved to be effective include clindamycin, rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones.

What are the 3 stages of sepsis?

There are three stages of sepsis: sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock.

Is osteomyelitis a serious disease?

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone, a rare but serious condition. Bones can become infected in a number of ways: Infection in one part of the body may spread through the bloodstream into the bone, or an open fracture or surgery may expose the bone to infection.

What happens if a bone infection goes untreated?

Osteomyelitis affects about 2 out of every 10,000 people. If left untreated, the infection can become chronic and cause a loss of blood supply to the affected bone. When this happens, it can lead to the eventual death of the bone tissue.

What is the prognosis for osteomyelitis?

Outlook (Prognosis) With treatment, the outcome for acute osteomyelitis is often good. The outlook is worse for those with long-term (chronic) osteomyelitis. Symptoms may come and go for years, even with surgery. Amputation may be needed, especially in people with diabetes or poor blood circulation.

What bone is the most common site of osteomyelitis?

In adults, the vertebrae are the most common site of hematogenous osteomyelitis, but infection may also occur in the long bones, pelvis, and clavicle. Primary hematogenous osteomyelitis is more common in infants and children, usually occurring in the long-bone metaphysis.

Is osteomyelitis an emergency?

Abstract. Osteomyelitis can present to the emergency department as an acute, subacute, or chronic orthopedic concern.

Can osteomyelitis lay dormant?

Many bone and joint infections are cleared with medication, surgery, or a combination of the two. However, for some people, osteomyelitis or septic arthritis may never completely go away. The bacteria can lie dormant in the body and return, even after treatment.

What are the complications of osteomyelitis?

Some of the complications of osteomyelitis include: Bone abscess (pocket of pus) Bone necrosis (bone death) Spread of infection Inflammation of soft tissue (cellulitis) Blood poisoning (septicaemia) Chronic infection that doesn’t respond well to treatment.